Warning: array_slice() expects parameter 1 to be array, boolean given in /home/uvatha/public_html/kayhoflander/wp-content/plugins/my-twitter-widget/widget.php on line 164

Warning: key() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in /home/uvatha/public_html/kayhoflander/wp-content/plugins/my-twitter-widget/widget.php on line 164

Tag Archive: teenagers

Jul 10

From: ‘Remembering summers past, a series’. This installment remembers that ‘Summer romances rarely survived until September”. A summer series first published in The Examiner, an easter Jackson County, Mo., daily newspaper

“What the heart has once owned and had, it shall never lose,”
- Henry Ward Beecher

Summer romances, a cultural phenomenon, were big in the 50s and 60s.forget_just_summer_romance_snow_1035825

I doubt if teens today truly understand what our summer romances were like– the giddiness, the misery, the sweetness, the inevitable parting.

Teen sweethearts do not part these days at summer’s end anyway. They simply text each other into infinity and blog unceasingly on Facebook.

We had one option and one only–write letters or hope they came. Usually we never saw or talked to our summer loves again.

For me, summer love meant Frank, and yes Pete, too.

I met Frank one summer at swim camp, and the next summer I met Pete while working out-of-state at a summer resort.

Both relationships lasted only for the summers in question. Letters were the way we stayed in touch at summer’s end as few people in those days had the technology to make long-distance phone calls. Traveling was out of the picture as well.

Eventually and predictably in the fall, the letters slowed and the romances faded.

When love went bad, girls and guys alike cried in our cherry phosphates while losing ourselves in movie and song.

It was a bittersweet, delicious time of life.

Once years later, just out of curiosity, I tried to find each of these dreamy guys.

I learned that Frank pursued a calling as a chaplain and likely died in Vietnam. Pete pursued a career as a hippy and might still be in Haight-Ashbury somewhere.

So life works out.

Yet, I still remember the songs about the heartbreak of summer when romances were sure to be fleeting and nearly always heartbreaking.

Remember the song “Summer Nights” from the blockbuster movie “Grease”. John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John sang “Summer Nights” about their rockin’ summer romance of 1959.

The lyrics of “See you in September” by The Happenings sounds like it was directed at lonely kids away from home for the summer, “I’ll be away each and every night/While I’m away don’t forget to write.”

While at summer camp, these teens often met their true love only to realize too late that their storybook romance would be fleeting. Or, they would worry if the boyfriend or girlfriend back home would wait for them and vice versa.

Gary Lewis and The Playboys sang, “Save your heart for me.”

Chad and Jeremy’s ballad “A Summer Song” admonished summer lovers to live in the moment because autumn would surely come.

The Beach Boys sang the upbeat “All Summer Long” while Brian Hyland crooned “Sealed with a Kiss” as he wrote letters to his sweetheart lest she forget him.

Do kids today have any idea what a summer romance was really like in the summers of our youth? Romantic. Unrequited. Unconsummated. I am guessing no.

At least we had the comfort of knowing that summer romance could live on in our hearts forever.

Summer Nights

Jul 10

Remembering summers past, a series Summer romances rarely survived until September

 

“What the heart has once owned and had, it shall never lose,”
- Henry Ward Beecher.

Summer romances, a cultural phenomenon, were big in the 50s and 60s.

I doubt if teens today truly understand what our summer romances were like– the giddiness, the misery, the sweetness, the inevitable parting.

Teen sweethearts do not part these days at summer’s end anyway. They simply text each other into infinity and blog unceasingly on Face Book.

We had one option and one only–write letters or hope they came. Usually we never saw or talked to our summer loves again.

For me, summer love meant Frank, and yes Pete, too.

I met Frank one summer at swim camp, and the next summer I met Pete while working out-of-state at a summer resort.

Both relationships lasted only for the summers in question. Letters were the way we stayed in touch at summer’s end as few people in those days had the technology to make long-distance phone calls. Traveling was out of the picture as well.

Eventually and predictably in the fall, the letters slowed and the romances faded.

When love went bad, girls and guys alike cried in our cherry phosphates while losing ourselves in movie and song.

It was a bittersweet, delicious time of life.

Once years later, just out of curiosity, I tried to find each of these dreamy guys.

I learned that Frank pursued a calling as a chaplain and likely died in Vietnam. Pete pursued a career as a hippy and might still be in Haight-Ashbury somewhere.

So life works out.

Yet, I still remember the songs about the heartbreak of summer when romances were sure to be fleeting and nearly always heartbreaking.

Remember the song “Summer Nights” from the blockbuster movie “Grease”. John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John sang “Summer Nights” about their rockin’ summer romance of 1959.

The lyrics of “See you in September” by The Happenings sounds like it was directed at lonely kids away from home for the summer, “I’ll be away each and every night/While I’m away don’t forget to write.”

While at summer camp, these teens often met their true love only to realize too late that their storybook romance would be fleeting. Or, they would worry if the boyfriend or girlfriend back home would wait for them and vice versa.

Gary Lewis and The Playboys sang, “Save your heart for me.”

Chad and Jeremy’s ballad “A Summer Song” admonished summer lovers to live in the moment because autumn would surely come.

The Beach Boys sang the upbeat “All Summer Long” while Brian Hyland crooned “Sealed with a Kiss” as he wrote letters to his sweetheart lest she forget him.

Do kids today have any idea what a summer romance was really like in the summers of our youth? Romantic. Unrequited. Unconsummated. I am guessing no.

At least we had the comfort of knowing that summer romance could live on in our hearts forever.

May 06

Today’s slang as crazy as Pig Latin

Today’s teenagers (a wireless computer, cell phone generation) have a linguistic code we Baby Boomers can learn if we try.

We may have grown up speaking Pig Latin (igpay atinlay) and, therefore, know a little something about secret codes ourselves.

The new messaging system that teens use is just about as crazy as the Pig Latin of our youth.

Are you LOL (laughing out loud) at this?

OMG (Oh, my gosh), I hope not.

YO (Hey)!

GFS (girlfriends) and BFS (boyfriends)–I thought we were BF4L (best friends for life), so D/W (don’t worry).

If you did not follow the above conversation, I could try to write it in Pig Latin,            Never mind, you might want to become familiar with the teenage slang of the day and lose the Pig Latin, even though they are equally zany.

Imagine this everyday occurence: a parent walks into the room while the teenager is typing on the computer or sees the teen text messaging on the ever-present cell phone.

Note to parents (NTP), a cell phone comes equipped with its own invisible, umbilical cord that is attached to the teenager’s body, BYKTA (but you know that already).

Seriously (SRSLY), back to my example.

The teen does not hesitate and begins to type strange acronyms and unusual words, ones that parents cannot possibly decipher.

You are not paranoid, they really are talking about you, and it is in the most minimal way possible.

The teenager might type one word to convene the urgency of the moment–POS (parent over shoulder), or this phrase, “Lights are on” (parents are in the room). They might text this one word that says it all—PAL (parents are listening).

As far as I know, grandchildren do not type GOS (grandparents over shoulder). Grandchildren most likely would not care a bit if we were looking over their shoulders.

Parents can relax because this secret teen dialogue is not meant to be disrespectful to adults, nor does it suggest any sort of rebellion.

The clandestine communication you are witnessing is simply a teenage version of shorthand because teenagers do not want to take the time to write a complete sentence.

That is all there is to it, JTLYK (just to let you know).

H/O (hold on).

We could be about to master teenage slang here.

You are catching on.

Other cyber code words you need in order to be in the know include: JK (just kidding); the letter “G” (good-bye); the letter “K” (OK); or JW (just wondering), and of course, SUP (short for what’s up).

If you should happen to see a teen type the word “FAT”, take no offense. They do not mean you are fat.  In their unwritten book of wireless codes, “fat” means nice.

Here are common examples of teenage chat slang, all requiring a minimal amount of typing: BFN (bye for now); BBL (be back later); BTDT (been there done that); GAL (get a life); xoxo (hugs and kisses); IANAL (I am not a lawyer, but…), LTNS (long time no see), and YBS (you’ll be sorry).

This one wins for saying the most with the least amount of letters—“R” (what are you doing tonight).

To that, I have this reply—“ROFL” (rolling on floor laughing).

By the way (BTW), I just learned that the use of ALL CAPS indicates one is shouting. Whoops!

And one more thing, make a NTS (note to self)–teenagers will not approve if parents start using their own slang in front of them.  BI (bad idea).

Well, I gotta run (GR), “ta ta for now” (TTFN).

Later (L8R).